Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Blown Minded: A Painted Music Video for Young Galaxy by Carine Khalife

Blown Minded: A Painted Music Video for Young Galaxy by Carine Khalife stop motion painting music video animation
Blown Minded: A Painted Music Video for Young Galaxy by Carine Khalife stop motion painting music video animation
Blown Minded: A Painted Music Video for Young Galaxy by Carine Khalife stop motion painting music video animation
Montreal-based visual artist Carine Khalife produced, directed, animated this music video for the 2011 track Blown Minded, off the album Shapeshifting by Young Galaxy. The entire clip is comprised of oil paint on glass photographed above from a camera. Khalife explains her process a bit more on her site:
Basically, my technique was to paint on a piece of glass fixed to a light box. I would paint on the glass with oil so that it wouldn’t dry, and I could play with it for hours. A camera, fixed overhead above the animation table and plugged in my computer, would capture my paintings frame by frame and create the animation using the software Stop Motion Pro (the aardman studio software). This process took place inside a dark room so that there wouldn’t be interference or changing lights on the paint. The single light source came from beneath the glass, revealing the textures and details of brushes movements.
I worked a lot with transparency. The more paint, the darker the image, and therefore the animation becomes about gesture, and the texture of brushstrokes; it’s a very physical, organic process. I based the number of frames per second (sometimes 8 sometimes 12) on the rhythm of the music. Everything is based on the rhythm. It was important for me, especially for the abstract parts, that I was responding to the song conversationally; like a running dialogue. I think I’ve listened to the song more than a thousand times. And because i would often listen to it and focus solely on drums, voice, lyrics, or melody – I was still able to hear new things each time.
The film has screened in festivals around the world and Khalife won a Director of Photography award at the Salon International de la Luz. (via vimeo)

Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic

Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic painting nature illustration animals
Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic painting nature illustration animals

Breathtaking, que no? 

A Chocolate Zoetrope at the Phillip Island Chocolate Factory

A Chocolate Zoetrope at the Phillip Island Chocolate Factory zoetropes food chocolate animation
Stop by the Phillip Island Chocolate Factory near Melbourne, Australia and you’re likely to encounter this tasty zoetrope made almost entirely of chocolate. A zoetrope is a device that creates the optical illusion of motion using rapid succession of static pictures or objects, several of which you can see right here on Colossal, including one made out of cake! (via laughing squid)

A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises From A Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery

A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery snakes sculpture bones anatomy aluminum
A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery snakes sculpture bones anatomy aluminum
A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery snakes sculpture bones anatomy aluminum
A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery snakes sculpture bones anatomy aluminum
A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery snakes sculpture bones anatomy aluminum
Currently on view at the Queensland Art Gallery is Ressort, a 174-foot (53 meter) aluminum and stainless steel snake skeleton by French/Chinese contemporary artist Huang Yong Ping. The twisting metal sculpture was commissioned for the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at QAGOMA which is the only major exhibition that focuses exclusively on contemporary art from Asia, the Pacific and Australia. The snake plays a prominent role in much of Ping’s artwork, as the symbol of the serpent is generally considered a good omen in Chinese culture. You can see much more of the artist’s work over at Kamel Mennour gallery. (via my modern met)

Stop Motion Wire and Paper Music Video by Patator Prod

Stop Motion Wire and Paper Music Video by Patator Prod wire stop motion paper music video animation
Stop Motion Wire and Paper Music Video by Patator Prod wire stop motion paper music video animation
There are some fantastic sequences in this brief stop motion clip by Victor Haegelin ofPatator Prod accompanied by music from Professor Kliq. Haegelin relies entirely on bent wire and paper to create everything you see and it’s amazing how fluid all the individual wire strands become when animated like this, wish it went a bit longer. (via vimeo)

Anti Gravity Object Modeling: " Mataerial " Is A Robot That Draws Sculptor In 3 D

Anti Gravity Object Modeling: Mataerial is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D sculpture robotics
Anti Gravity Object Modeling: Mataerial is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D sculpture robotics
Anti Gravity Object Modeling: Mataerial is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D sculpture robotics
Anti Gravity Object Modeling: Mataerial is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D sculpture robotics
Anti Gravity Object Modeling: Mataerial is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D sculpture robotics
A few months ago we saw the invention of the world’s first 3D printing pen, the 3Doodler, that allows people to draw small objects seemingly out of thin air. Now, a large team of researchers including Petr Novikov, Saša Jokić from the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) and Joris Laarman Studio, have decided to up the ante. The result of the team’s research is Mataerial, a large robotic tool that can draw three dimensional objects that sprout vertically from the ground or horizontally from a wall, seemingly without regard to the effects of gravity. Where traditional 3D printers print layer after layer of 2D material to build more complex shapes, Mataerial relies on a chemical reaction between two components of a thermosetting polymer to solidify almost instantly as it extrudes from a nozzle. Perhaps the Mataerial team says it better:

Welded Pine Cone Sculptors by Floyd Elzinga

Welded Shovel Pine Cones by Floyd Elzinga seeds sculpture plants
Welded Shovel Pine Cones by Floyd Elzinga seeds sculpture plants
Welded Shovel Pine Cones by Floyd Elzinga seeds sculpture plants
Artist Floyd Elzinga works with a wide variety of materials to create sculptural landscapes, installations, and even cut steel flags. My favorite of his works are these giant metal pine cones made from welded spade heads, check out a few more over on Flickr. (via haynay)

30 Hour Time Lapse Drawing by Paul White

30 Hour Drawing Time lapse by Paul White timelapse drawing decay cars
30 Hour Drawing Time lapse by Paul White timelapse drawing decay cars
I love to watch artists work and this time-lapse video by Australian artist Paul White white is no exception. Filmed by Johnny Blank over 30 hours it captures White working on a pencil drawing of a single wrecked vehicle, a theme of transportation meets decay that plays a prominent role in much of his artwork. The video was shown as part of a recent presentation at Semi-Permanent in Sydney earlier this month. See much more of his work here.

Monday, May 20, 2013

Chandeliers Made From Recycled Bike Parts Under A Texas Underpass


Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Recycled Bike Part Chandeliers Under a Texas Overpass recycling lighting bicycles
Ballroom Luminoso is a series of six chandeliers designed by artists Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock currently installed in San Antonio, Texas. Made from custom made structural steel, custom LEDs and recycled bicycle parts, the lights project colorful silhouettes of sprockets and other pieces onto the otherwise drab cement underpass. From the artist’s statement about the project:
Ballroom Luminoso references the area’s past, present, and future in the design of its intricately detailed medallions. The images in the medallions draw on the community’s agricultural history, strong Hispanic heritage, and burgeoning environmental movement. The medallions are a play on the iconography of La Loteria, which has become a touchstone of Hispanic culture. Utilizing traditional tropes like La Escalera (the Ladder), La Rosa (the Rose), and La Sandía (the Watermelon), the piece alludes to the neighborhood’s farming roots and horticultural achievements. Each character playfully rides a bike acting as a metaphor for the neighborhood’s environmental progress, its concurrent eco-restoration projects, and its developing cycling culture.
If you liked this project you might also enjoy Carolina Fontoura Alzaga’s bike chain chandeliers. Images above courtesy photographer Fred Gonzales. (via lustik)

Neon Swing and Bird Cage by Su-Mei Tse


Neon Swing & Bird Cage by Su Mei Tse swings sculpture neon
Neon Swing & Bird Cage by Su Mei Tse swings sculpture neon



and the music for the art goes to! Thank you Bjork.....

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Kenichi Kanazawa Visualizes Sound Using Rainbow Colored Sand


Japanese artist Kenichi Kanazawa visualizes sound by manipulating multicolored sand atop a steel tabletop.

Monday, May 13, 2013

Fresh Tendrils : A Japanese Ad Agency Reinvents Advertising For Funeral Services With Pressed Flowers


A Japanese Ad Agency Reinvents Advertising for Funeral Services Japan flowers death bones anatomy advertising
A Japanese Ad Agency Reinvents Advertising for Funeral Services Japan flowers death bones anatomy advertising
A Japanese Ad Agency Reinvents Advertising for Funeral Services Japan flowers death bones anatomy advertising
A Japanese Ad Agency Reinvents Advertising for Funeral Services Japan flowers death bones anatomy advertising
A Japanese Ad Agency Reinvents Advertising for Funeral Services Japan flowers death bones anatomy advertising
In the terrifying wake of 2011 the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan, funerals become a commonplace ordeal as the nation dealt with unprecedented loss. Like most cultures, Japanese funerals are somber affairs punctuated with black and white with any deviation considered taboo or inappropriate. Reflecting on the enormity of recent events, funeral homeNishinihon Tenrei approached Tokyo-based ad agency I&S BBDO to create an ad for a trade show that would buck the trend of muted colors so prevalent in the industry. The agency responded with this unprecedented figure of a skeleton made with pressed flowers that overtly celebrates the cycle of life by introducing color and elements of nature that are often avoided in such services. The image was considered so successful it went on to win a design merit award from the 2013 One Club Awards. You can see it in even higher resolution here. (via spoon & tamago)

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